Miracles of Jesus

The Good Shepherd

The banquet hall was filled. To speak for the occasion, a renowned orator had been brought in. After a wonderful meal, he mesmerized the crowd with his voice as he recited poetry and famous selections of speeches.

Near the end of the program, he asked if anyone had a favorite selection that they would like for him to recite. From the back of the room, an old man stood up and kindly asked if he would mind reciting the 23rd Psalm. The speaker said that he would be glad to do it if, when he was finished, the old man would recite it as well. The old gentleman nodded his head and sat back down.

In a beautifully trained voice that resonated throughout the great room, the speaker began, “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures…” When he was finished, there was thunderous applause and a standing ovation.

He then looked at the old man and said, “All right sir, it is your turn now.”
In a trembling voice that was cracked by time, the old man began to recite, “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want…” It is said that when he was finished, there was no applause, but neither was there a dry eye in the building.

After the event, someone asked the famous speaker what he thought produced the different responses in the crowd. The speaker paused, thought for a moment and said, “I know the 23rd Psalm, but that man knows the shepherd. That makes all the difference.”

Do you know the shepherd?
Miracles of Jesus, Stories of the Supernatural

The Miraculous Crucifix of St.Camillus de Lellis

Vivacious and troublesome as a child, Camillus was already a compulsive gambler by the time of his adolescence. At the age of 19, he joined his father in the military service and fought in two battles. One of these, in 1571, was that at Lepanto, during which the Christians won over the Turks in what is acknowledged to have been a victory of the Holy Rosary. After he was discharged from the military, Camillus returned to Italy and gambled away his inheritance and his equipment. It is said that he even took to begging on the steps of the Cathedral of Mafredonia. After taking a position as a mason’s helper, he came into contact with a Capuchin priest through whose counseling he experienced a complete reform and a rekindling of faith.

His entrance into religious life was abbreviated by a recurring ulceration of his leg that had once interrupted his military career. He applied for treatment at a hospital in Rome but was so dissatisfied with the servants’ lack of cooperation and constant unfaithfulness to duty that be began the establishment of an order whose members were to bind themselves by a fourth vow—to the charitable care of the sick and dying. This vow is still made by members of the order, in addition to those of poverty, chastity and obedience. With the encouragement of his confessor, St. Philip Neri, Camillus commenced studying for the priesthood and was ordained in 1584. During the early days of his nursing order, when he diligently worked to improve the condition of the hospital in which he served as director, many opposed his efforts.

One day a scoundrel entered the oratory of the congregation, removed the crucifix from the wall, cast it aside and disturbed the contents of the room. The discovery of the vandalism vandalism greatly troubled the Saint, who reverently removed the crucifix from the oratory to another room.

During the night, while complaining and praying before this crucifix, he saw the body of Christ move, detach one arm from the affixing nail and reach toward him. At the same time, a voice came from the crucifix with great clarity and spoke words both consoling and reassuring: “Take courage, faint-hearted one, continue the work you have begun. I will be with you because it is My work.” The crucifix is now enshrined in the principal church of the order, the Church of St. Mary Magdalene in Rome. Unquestionably one of the most beautiful churches in that city, it also contains the enshrined relics of the Saint. The order founded by St. Camillus, the Order of the Clerics Regular Ministers of the Sick (Camillians), always wore on the front of their robes a large red cross that was meant to inspire the sick and dying to sentiments of confidence and contrition. This was the first time the symbol of the red cross was used as a sign of organized charity, almost 300 years before the establishment of the International Red Cross. The red cross still decorates the front of the habits worn by members of the Order, with smaller versions being distributed to those who request them. Made of felt, these smaller versions measure an inch and a half in length and are blessed with special prayers that were inserted in the Roman Ritual. Their popularity dates from 1601 and is due to an apparent miracle. While the Camillians were busy with the sick during the battle of Canizza, a tent burned in which the brothers stored their equipment. Everything was destroyed except a red cross that had been attached to a religious habit. One of the officers asked for the cross and wore it as a breastplate, remaining unharmed for the remainder of the battle. The smaller versions have been propagated by the millions throughout the world procuring benefits of resignation, conversion, or recovery for the sick.

~Source:”Miraculous Images of Our Lord” by Joan Carroll Cruz

Eucharistic Miracles

Eucharistic Miracle of LaRochelle,France

Eucharistic Miracle of LaRochelle,France (1461)

The Eucharistic miracle of La Rochelle concerns the instantaneous cure of a boy, paralyzed and mute since the age of seven, when he received Holy Communion at Mass on Easter Sunday in 1461. He was completely healed of his paralysis and was once again able to speak. The most authoritative document that visually describes this miracle is the painted-manuscript preserved still today in the Cathedral of La Rochelle.

During Easter of 1461, Mrs. Jehan Leclerc brought her twelve year old son, Bertrand, to the Church of St. Bartholomew. Bertrand had been paralyzed and mute since the age of seven due to a terrible fall. When the time for Holy Communion arrived, he indicated to his mother that he also wanted to receive Jesus in the Eucharist. Initially the priest did not want to give the young man Communion, because the boy was not able to go to Confession given his muteness.

The young man, however, continued to beseech the priest for Communion and, in the end, the priest did permit him to receive the Blessed Sacrament. From the first moment that Bertrand received the Host, he began to feel shaken by a mysterious force. He was able to move and to speak. He was cured.

According to the hand-written document, immediately after the miraculous event Bertrand’s first words were, “Adjutorium nostrum in nomine Domini!” (“Our help is in the name of the Lord!”) The most authoritative document that visually describes this miracle is the painted manuscript preserved to this day in the Cathedral of La Rochelle .

There are two drops of Blood from our Lord, Jesus Christ, collected on Calvary during the Passion, preserved in the church of Neuvy-Saint-Sépulcre in Indre. They were brought to France in 1257 by Cardinal Eudes returning from the Holy Land.

This relic of the coagulated Blood is known to be pure, because the Precious Blood was not mixed with water or earth. From the year 1257, the relic had been kept in this church which was built in the first half of the year 1000 and modeled on the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem.

In order to honor the holy relic of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus, numerous indulgences have been granted. The Archbishop of Bruges, André Frémiot, founded the Confraternity of the Most Precious Blood in the year 1621.

Two years later, Pope Gregory XV granted new indulgences to the faithful devoted to the Sacred Blood. Each Monday of Easter and every first day of July, a Solemn Mass is celebrated and there are processions to adore and honor the Sacred Relic. There have been many graces attributed to invoking the Sacred Blood of Neuvy-Saint-Sépulcre.

January Feast Days, Miracles of Jesus, Pious Devotions

Miraculous Infant Jesus of Prague

The original statue of the Infant Jesus of Prague was created as a royal wedding gift from a Spanish Princess to her Austrian royal cousin. The statue of the Infant is a slender and beautifully-modeled figure and is carved of wood thinly coated with wax, standing nineteen inches tall, with the left foot barely visable under a long white tunic. The left hand encircles a miniature globe, surmounted by a cross, signifying the world-wide kingship of the Christ Child. The right hand is extended in blessing with the first two fingers being upraised to symbolize the two natures of Christ, while the folded thumb and last two fingers touch each other representing the unity of the Father, The Son, and the Holy Spirit in the mystery of the Blessed Trinity.

The face has a strange power of evoking sentiments of deep gratitude of the mystery of God-made-Man. For all His majestic posture and regal attire, the little King of Prague is more striking for His outward expression of human littleness than by the impression of hidden greatness. The wardrobe of the Infant is similar to the priest’s alb: one is of white linen, the other is of lace. Covering these is a dalmatic made of silk or velvet over which is worn a cape. It represents the Infant Jesus dressed in royal robes, wearing a crown. He is King of the Universe.

Later, the statue had been discarded in war and His hands destroyed. Found by a Carmelite, he fixed the hands and placed the statue in a place of honor in the Carmelite Church in Prague, Czech Republic.

In 1637, as Fr. Cyril prayed before the Infant, he was filled with wonder, contemplating the loving God Who became a child for His people. Suddenly, the statue spoke to the stunned Carmelite:

Have mercy on Me and I will have mercy on you.
Give Me hands and I will give you peace.
The more you honor Me, the more I will bless you.

Many miracles have occurred through intercession to the Divine Infant. During one invasion, all the children of the city were taken to the Church for protection—praying to the Infant, they were all saved. For almost four centuries, this promise of protection and blessing has inspired devotion and love of the Infant Jesus of Prague.

The home of the Infant Jesus of Prague is in the city of Prague, which is the capital of the Czech Republic. The original statue has been restored and preserved in the Carmelite church of Our Lady of Victory (pictured here). The Church was returned to the Carmelites after the fall of Communism. The statue provides spiritual uplift for millions of people who have adopted the Holy Infant’s call to humility, simplicity, and sincerity and to become little in order to become great and pleasing before Christ the King.

Devotion to the Miraculous Infant Jesus celebrates the “Child of God”—the great mystery of the Incarnation. The child in all of us believes in the humanity and divinity of Christ and rejoices in God’s caring and protective love for us. The Infant reminds us that God is holding us in the palm of His hand.

The effective spiritual meditation is the reason why the Infant Jesus of Prague is so continuously appealing to human hearts all over the world, which he has so firmly in His hands. You can find His statue in almost any church, convent, monastery and house, representing a Divine Protection toward His devotees.

Prayer to the Miraculous Infant Jesus of Prague

Prayer Revelated by Our Lady To the Venerable Father F. Cyril OCD

O Infant Jesus, I have recourse to You and ask You through the intercession of Your Holy Mother to help me in my need, ( mention it here) for I firmly believe that Your Divinity can help me.

I hope, in complete trust, to obtain Your holy grace. I love You with all my heart and with all the strength of my soul. I am truly sorry for all my sins, and beg You, O good Jesus, to give me strength to conquer them. I shall never offend You and I am ready to suffer rather than to cause You pain.

From now on I want to serve with complete faithfulness and for love of You, O Divine Child, I will love my neighbour as well as myself. Omnipotent Child, Lord Jesus, again I implore You, help me in this need of mine (mention it).

Grant me the grace of possessing You eternally, with Mary and Joseph and of adoring You with the holy angels in Your heavenly court. Amen

Novena to the Infant Jesus of Prague in Urgent Need

(To be said for nine days or nine consecutive hours)

O Jesus, Who said, “Ask and you shall receive, seek and you shall find, knock and it shall be opened to you,” through the intercession of Mary, Your most holy Mother, I knock, I seek, I ask that my prayer be answered. (Mention your request)

O Jesus, Who said, “All that you ask of the Father in My Name He will grant you,” through the intercession of Mary, Your most holy Mother, I humbly and urgently ask Your Father in Your Name that my prayer be granted. (Mention your request.)

O Jesus, Who said, “Heaven and earth will pass away, but My word shall not pass,” through the intercession of Mary, Your most holy Mother, I feel confident that my prayer will be granted. (Mention your request) Amen.

Chaplet of the Holy Infant Jesus

“The More You Honor Me The More I Will Bless You”

On the medal the following invocation is said:

Divine Infant Jesus, I adore Thy Cross and I accept all the cross Thou wilt be pleased to send me. Adorable Trinity, I offer Thee for the glory of Thy Holy Name of God, all the adorations of the Sacred Heart of the Holy Infant Jesus.

Each Our Father and Hail Mary is preceded by the aspiration:

“And the Word was made flesh and dwelt amongst us.”

On finishing the chaplet say:

Holy Infant Jesus, bless and protect us.

This devotion owes its origin to the zeal of Sister Marguerite, a Carmelite religious, who died in France in 1648. She was distinguished for her devotion to the Holy Child Jesus.

Directed by heavenly guidance, Venerable Sister Marguerite of the BI. Sacrament (1619-1648), a Carmelite nun, fashioned the Infant Jesus Chaplet. Because its recitation pleases Him so very much

Jesus promised Sister Marguerite that the faithful who recite it in memory of His Birth, His Flight into Egypt, and His Hidden Life at Nazareth, will not only be granted the special graces of purity of heart and innocence, but in addition will be unfailingly assisted by His Divine Help in all their spiritual and temporal wants. Moreover, to encourage the use of this Holy Chaplet, P. Pius IX granted a 100 days indulgence for each recitation, also applicable to the Poor Souls (Aug. 9, 1855).

Pious Devotions

Jesus,Master,Teach Me

JESUS, MASTER, TEACH ME.

Teach me, teach me, dearest Jesus

In Thine own sweet loving way.

All the lessons of perfection

I must practice day by day.

Teach me Meekness, dearest Jesus,

Of Thine own the counterpart;

Not in words and actions only.

But the meekness of the heart.

Teach Humility, sweet Jesus,

To this poor, proud heart of mine,

Which yet wishes,O my Jesus,

To be modelled after Thine.

Teach me Fervor, dearest Jesus,

To comply with every grace,

So as never to look backwards,

Never slacken in the race.

Teach me Poverty, sweet Jesus,

That my heart may never cling

To whate’er its love might sever

From my Saviour, Spouse, and King,

Teach me Chastity, sweet Jesus,

That my every day may see

Something added to the likeness

That my soul should bear to Thee,

Teach Obedience,dearest Jesus,

Such as was Thy daily food

In Thy toilsome earthly journey

From the cradle to the rood.

Teach Thy Heart to me, dear Jesus,

Is my fervent, final prayer,

For all beauties and perfections

Are in full perfection there.

Holy Mass, Pious Devotions

How to Share in 500,000 Masses

The intention we ought to have when saying “Jesus” is to offer all the Masses that are being said all over the world for the glory of God, for our own needs, and for the world at large. About 500,000 Masses are celebrated daily. And we can and should share in all of these.

The Mass brings Jesus to our altars. At every Mass He is once again present here on earth, as really as when He became man in His Mother’s womb. He also sacrifices Himself on the Altar as really and truly as He did on Calvary, though in a mystical, unbloody manner. The Mass is said, not only for all those who assist at church, but for all those who wish to hear it and offer it with the priest.

All we have to do is to say reverently, “Jesus, Jesus,” with the intention of offering these Masses and participating in them. By doing this we have a share in all of them.

It is a wonderful grace to assist at and to offer one Mass; what will it not be to offer and share in 500,000 Masses every day!

Therefore, every time we say “Jesus,” let it be our intention:

To offer to God all the infinite love and merits of the Incarnation.

To offer to God the Passion and Death of Jesus Christ.

To offer to God all the 500,000 Masses being celebrated in the world – for His glory and our own intentions.

All that we have to do is to say the one word, “Jesus,” but knowing what we are doing.

St. Mechtilde was accustomed to offer the Passion of Jesus in union with all the Masses of the world for the souls in Purgatory.

Our Lord once showed her Purgatory open and thousands of souls going up to Heaven as the result of her little prayer.

When we say, “Jesus,” we can offer the Passion and the Masses of the world, either for ourselves or for the souls in Purgatory, or for any other intention we please.

We should always, too, offer them for the world at large and our own country in particular.

~Source:”Wonders of the Holy Name”

Eucharistic Miracles

Eucharistic Miracle of Faverney,France

On the Vigil of the Feast of Pentecost, the monks of Faverney decided to expose the Blessed Sacrament for public adoration. During the night, a fire flared up which destroyed the altar and the sacred furnishings, but not the monstrance containing the Sacred Host. The monstrance was retrieved after a few days while it was suspended in the air perfectly intact. The miraculous Host is still kept today and many are the pilgrims who every year hasten to venerate the miracle.

In the 17th century, Protestantism and Calvinism spread quickly in France by means of the many material benefits conceded by the new religions to the members of the nobility and the clergy coming from the Catholic Church. This placed at risk the faith of many and created many uncertainties, even in the monasteries.

In the city of Faverney there was a Benedictine Abbey whose monks had departed a great deal from the rule of their founder. They held only the highest esteem for the devotion to the Lady of Notre-Dame la Blanche, known in all the area for its many miracles. Through her intercession many miracles had in fact been verified, among which was even the returning to life of two infants who were not yet baptized.

In 1608, on the Vigil of the Feast of Pentecost, the monks decided to prepare an altar for the exposition and adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. The lunette of the monstrance was very large, and because of this, they decided to put in two Hosts. When Vespers had finished the monks left the monstrance exposed on the provisional altar. On the next morning, the sacristan opened the church and found it full of smoke, with the provisional altar completely reduced to ashes.

He started to yell, and immediately the religious and other people hastened and proceeded to remove the ashes with the hope of finding some part of the monstrance. When the smoke began to clear, they were astonished on seeing that the monstrance was suspended in the air.

The multitude increased and crowded to see the Eucharistic marvel, in which the Hosts had remained unharmed regardless of the fire. The religious were astonished and unable to make a decision. They asked the counsel of the Capuchin friars of Vesoul. The friars immediately prepared a new altar over the burned one and celebrated Holy Mass.

During the elevation of the Host, the monstrance slowly descended upon the new altar. When the canonical process finished, on July 10, the Archbishop of Besançon declared that the miracle was authentic, and on September 13, the Archbishop of Rodi, who was the nuncio in Brussels, made it known to Pope Paul V who granted a Bull of Indulgence.

The miracle rekindled the faith of many. In 1862, the Congregation of Rites authorized the celebration of the miracle. In 1908 the third centenary of the miracle was solemnly commemorated with a National Eucharistic Congress. Even today it is possible to see and venerate the relic containing one of the two Hosts which remained unharmed. The other Host, unfortunately, after it was donated to the Church of Dole, was destroyed by the revolutionaries in 1794.