Miracles of Jesus, Stories of the Supernatural

Miraculous Crucifix of Our Lady of Guadalupe

The Miraculous Crucifix of Our Lady of Guadalupe

After the conquest of Mexico by Hernando Cortez in 1519, Christianity was introduced into the country by the prelates he brought with him from Spain. By the year 1525, missionary work was well under way, principally by the Franciscans, Dominicans, Augustinians and the Jesuits. Conversions were numerous and the Faith flourished. The Church operated in peace until the Mexican wars of independence took place between the years 1810 to 1821. Little by little, laws began to be passed against the Church through the influence of the Freemasons, an organization that had been introduced into Mexico by Joel R. Poinsset. When the Mexican Constitution was adopted in 1857, separation of church and state was decreed. Under the presidency of church-educated Benito Juarez and his successor, President D. Sebastian Lerdo de Tejada, laws against the Church were stringently enforced, producing a veritable persecution. Under the various laws, official recognition that was formerly given to ecclesiastical persons and corporations was withdrawn. No religious rite or demonstration of any kind was permitted outside church buildings. The state claimed possession of all church buildings. All religious orders were suppressed, as were all confraternities or organizations annexed to religious communities. According to law, all religious were reduced to the secular state and were forbidden to wear their religious habits in public. Superiors of communities were regarded as state criminals. The laws went on and on. Finally, in 1867, all relations with the Vatican were discontinued. Despite the restrictions placed on the Church in Mexico, the Faith was maintained.

Today, Mexico is regarded as being overwhelmingly Roman Catholic. Although Mexico’s churches were closed around the year 1921, the nation’s beloved shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe remained open for public services. The government apparently hesitated to close the shrine for fear of provoking an insurrection. It has been speculated that enemies of the Church plotted secretly to destroy the Faith by harming the miraculous image of Our Lady. If the image were destroyed, so they thought, the shrine would lose its attraction, and the number of services would gradually diminish until none were held at all. The plan was put into action on November 14, 1921. His identity remains a mystery, but it is known that an enemy of the Faith carried a large bouquet of flowers to the very altar situated under the miraculous image of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Unknown to church personnel, an explosive device with a timer was hidden in the flowers. The bomb exploded with a great roar. Chunks of marble and masonry flew about, and stained glass windows were shattered; destruction of the altar and the sanctuary was extensive. Thankfully, no one was harmed. One can imagine that as soon as everyone recovered from the shock, their first concern was for the miraculous image. Much to the relief of everyone, the image remained perfectly intact; in fact, its thin glass covering was not even cracked. Amid cries of amazement, the preservation of the image and the security of the glass were regarded as miraculous.

Yet another miracle became known when it was discovered that the large bronze crucifix that had been positioned directly above the altar and beneath the image was now on the floor. The bomb had exploded with such force that the crucifix had been bent from the impact. The curve of the heavy crucifix attested to the strength of the bomb and reinforced the opinion that the preservation of the image was indeed miraculous. The man who had intended to destroy the Faith by planting the bomb had failed in his efforts, since the opposite response was produced.

A special Chapel of Reparation to the Blessed Sacrament was opened to atone for this outrage and for the many offenses committed against the Church since the adoption of the Constitution in 1857. Later, to preserve the image from other attempts by the Blessed Virgin’s enemies, the miraculous portrait was mounted behind bulletproof glass.

Persecution of the Church continued. Under the regulations mentioned above and many more that are not noted here, many priests and nuns were martyred, including the saintly Fr. Miguel Pro, who was a victim of a firing squad in 1927. Fr. Pro’s cause for canonization was introduced in 1952. He has since been declared Blessed. We are pleased to note that Mexico’s relations with the Vatican were restored in September of 1992, after a span of 125 years. President Carlos Salinas de Gortari oversaw constitutional reforms that ended the most rigorous restrictions on the Church. Clergy can now vote and wear clerical garb in public. The crucifix that experienced the force of the explosion that was meant for the image of Our Lady is now displayed in the foyer of the new basilica. Resting on a pillow, the crucifix is kept in a decorated glass enclosure. Countless pilgrims gaze in wonder at this object that attests to the miraculous nature of the portrait of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

~Source:”Miraculous Images of Our Lord”

Miracles of Jesus, Stories of the Supernatural

Miraculous Crucifix of Limpias

Miraculous Crucifix of Limpias Spain

When entering the sixteenth-century Church of St. Peter, attention is immediately captured by the beautiful life-size figure of the crucified Savior located above the main altar. Arranged on either side of the crucifix, and somewhat below it, are larger-than-life size figures of the Sorrowful Mother and St. John the Apostle. Believed to have been the work of Pedro de Mena, who died in 1693, the crucifix was given to the church by Don Diego de la Piedra Secadura, who had been born at Limpias in 1716.

The crucifix is a meditation on the sufferings of Our Lord and is thought to portray the Crucified in the final moments of His agony. Measuring six feet tall, the corpus is clothed with a loin cloth that is held in place with a rope. The feet are one atop the other and are pierced with a single nail. The index and middle fingers of both pierced hands are extended as though giving a final blessing. The face of Our Lord is of a particular beauty, with it’s eyes of china looking towards Heaven so that, for the most part, only the whites of the eyes are visible.

The first recorded miracle involving this crucifix took place in 1914, five years before the grand miracles of 1919. The recipient of the favor was Don Antonio Lopez, a monk belonging to the Order of the Pauline Fathers who conducted a college in Limpas. his entire account reads as follows:

One day in the month of August, 1914, I went into the parish church of Limpias, by order of my friend D. Gregorio Bringas, to fix the electric light over the high altar. In order to work more comfortably I put two large cases on the altar, an on them a ladder, the ends of which I leaned against the wall that serves as a background to the figure of the Crucified One.

After I had worked for two hours, in order to rest myself a little I began to clean the figure so that it could be seen more clearly. My head was on a level with the Head of Christ, and at a distance of only a couple of feet from it. It was a lovely day and through the window in the sanctuary a flood of light streamed into the church and lit up the whole altar. As I was gazing at the crucifix with the closest attention, I noticed with astonishment that Our Lord’s eyes were gradually closing, and for five minutes I saw them quite closed.

Overwhelmed with fright at such an unexpected spectacle, I could still hardly quite believe what I saw, and was about to come down from the ladder. Notwithstanding, my bewilderment was so great that my strength suddenly failed me; I lost my balance, fainted, and fell from the ladder onto the edge of the altar itself and down the steps into the sanctuary.

Another Miracle was when Archpriest D. Eduardo Miqueli was celebrating Holy Mass, both missionaries were occupied in the confessional. Fr. Agatangelo, however, delivered the day’s sermon based on the words “My son, give me thy heart.” (pro.23:26). While he was speaking, a girl of about 12 entered the confessional of Fr. Jalon and told him the eyes of Christ on the cross were closed.Thinking that her claim was a product of her imagination, the priest ignored her claim until other children also came to him with the same message.

After the parish priest was called from the sacristy and was told the eyes of the Crucified were opening and closing and that the figure was turning His gaze from side to side, he, too, fell on his knees to pray. But his prayer was soon interrupted by many of the people who declared that the figures was perspiring. Fr. Jalon climbed up and saw that the perspiration covered the figures neck and chest. after touching the neck he looked upon his fingers that were wet with the fluid. As verification of what had taken place, he showed his moistened fingers to the congregation. Fr. Agatangelo later saw the miracle several times when he prayed alone in the church at night.

Another apparition took place on Palm Sunday, April 13, 1919, when two prominent men of Limpas approached the altar. Speaking of hallucination and mass hysteria as they looked upon the crucifix, one of them suddenly pointed upward and feel to his knees, crying for mercy and proclaiming his belief in the miracle. On Easter Sunday April 20, in the presence of a group of nuns know as the Daughter of the Cross who conducted a girls school in Limpas. They saw the eyes and lips of Santo Cristo move. Rev. Baron Von Kleist reports that:

Many said the Savior looked at them; at some in a kindly manner, and at others gravely, and at yet others with a penetrating and stern glance. Many of them saw tears in His eyes; others noticed that drops of blood ram down from the temples pierced by the crown of thorns; some saw froth on His lips and sweat on His body; others again saw how He turned His eyes from side to side, and let His gaze pass over the whole assembly of people; or how; at the Benediction, He made a movement of the eyes as if giving the bless; how at the same time He moved the thorn- crowned head from on side to the other. Others had the impression that a deep, submissive sigh was wrested from His breast, some believed they saw Him whisper-in short, the most varied manifestations were observed on this crucifix.

One of the first to declare his experience to the secular press was the well-known and highly respected D. Adolf Arenaza. His testimony was published May 5, 1919 in the newspaper La Gazeta del Norte, which was published in Bilbao. He reported that he joined a procession going to Limpas in order to visit the crucifix. While looking through his field-glasses he saw the movement of the eyes four times. He further stated that it could not have been and effect of the light nor and hallucination, since people saw the miracles from all parts of the church. He then asked, “Does Our Lord really move His eyes… I am rather of the opinion that He really does move them, for I have seen it myself.”

Several albums are found in the sacristy of the church of the Limpias. these contain well over 8,000 testimonies of people who had seen the wonderful apparitions. Of these 2,500 were sworn on oath.

The first Bishop to be favored with an apparition was Don Manuel Ruiz y Rodriguez of Cuba, who went to Limpas following a visit to Rome. After returning home he composed a detailed pastoral letter to the members of his diocese in which he told of the miraculous crucifix. He disclosed that he had seen the figure close and open the mouth, how it moved it’s head from one side to the other how the face took on an expression of Death. Later he again saw the mouth move. “He shut it very slowly but opened it quickly… the closing of the mouth was slow until one lip touched the other.

Finally a report made by a medical student D. Heriberto de la Villa which was published in the paper Del Pueblo Astur on July 8, 1919. Little by little the breast and face became dark blue, the eyes move to the right then the left, upwards and down, the mouth somewhat open, as if He was having breathing difficulty. I also noticed that above the left eyebrow a wound formed, out of which a drop of blood flowed over His eyebrow, and remained stationary by the eye-lids. I believe it is my duty to swear upon oath what I had seen, and I did so in the sacristy of the church.

I will conclude with a brief report made by a journalist. After watching the movement of the eyes and mouth he stated:I could perceive two movements of the jawbone, as if He were saying two syllables with His lips. I shut my eyes quite tight and asked myself: “What will He have said?” The answer was not long in coming, for in my innermost self I clearly heard the significant and blessed words, “Love Me!”

Perhaps that is why Our Lord performed so many wonders for eyes of believers and unbelievers. At Limpas He demonstrated the agony of His death and the extent of His love for us, not only to evoke sentiments of pity and repentance, but also to ask, no, to plead with us to love Him in return.

~Source:”Miraculous Images of Our Lord”

Miracles of Jesus, Stories of the Supernatural

The Miraculous Child Jesus of Loretto

An ancient miraculous statue of the Child Jesus, which originally came from Switzerland, is devoutly kept at the Loreto convent of the Capuchin nuns in Salzburg, Austria.

The principal personality in its history is Fr. John Chrysostom Schenk, a Capuchin priest who was given the statue by a superior. Fr. Chrysostom was so devoted to his ivory statue of the Child Jesus that he was eventually nicknamed “Christkindl Pater.” The good priest made a wooden carrying case for the statue that enabled him to carry it more easily on his errands of mercy. At times he loaned it to the sick, but if they delayed in returning it, the statue was frequently returned to the good priest in a miraculous manner.

Fr. Chrysostom died a most holy death on November 25, 1634. Because he had so often carried his beloved statue with him on his apostolic errands, the image was well known. It soon became a center of devotion in Salzburg, where it is still venerated under the name Miraculous Child Jesus of Loreto.

~Source:”Miraculous Images of Our Lord”

spiritual warfare

The Saints and the Sign of the Cross

In the lives of the Saints we find other innumerable proofs of the power of the Sign of the Cross.

St. Dominic raised the dead to life by the holy Sign.

St. Vincent Ferrer worked hundreds hundreds of miracles by this blessed Sign.

Tertullian relates that the Christians in the first centuries began everything with the Sign of the Cross.

When they left their homes or reentered them, they blessed themselves.

Arising in the morning or going to rest at night, they made the Sign of the Cross with great devotion.

In all dangers and temptations they made the same holy Sign.

St. Patrick made the Sign of the Cross 400 times a day.

All good Christians should strive to make the Sign of the Cross as frequently as possible.

By this blessed Sign, devoutly made, we give immense glory to God, for we offer to Him the infinite merits of the death of Jesus Christ.

But never, never should a Christian make the Sign of the Cross hastily or irreverently.

~Source:”How to be Happy,How to be Holy”

Miracles of Jesus, Stories of the Supernatural

The Child Jesus of Deols

The distinguished Benedictine Abbey at Déols (a suburb of Chateauroux) was founded in the year 917 by Ebbes the Noble. Sometimes called the Breast of St. Peter because of its influence and service to the Church, the Abbey’s privileges have been confirmed by 30 popes. It was in front of this venerable abbey that the spectacular miracle of Déols took place.

A column situated in a place of honor supported a statue of the Blessed Virgin holding the Child Jesus. Here the villagers were accustomed to pause for a moment of prayer. Located in front of the column and the abbey was an area where the people frequently gathered in friendly exchange. Also gathering there during the English occupation were rough English soldiers who delighted in mocking the poor and especially the people who prayed before the blessed statue.

The miraculous event took place on May 31, 1187, when the English soldiers were engaged in a game of dice. The soldier who lost the game became enraged. To vent his anger, he picked up a large stone and flung it at the statue, breaking off the hand of the Holy Child. According to the historian Philippe Auguste, a contemporary of the event, “A stream of blood poured from the arm of the broken image and made a pool on the earth below. The fellow who flung the stone was seized with madness, and dropped down dead on the spot. John Lackland, and Adhemar, Viscount of Limoges, carefully collected the blood and deposited it in a rich chapel erected in England and dedicated to the Virgin.” According to the historian, Rigord, countless cures were effected by the application of this blood. News of the miracle spread everywhere.

The English soldiers who were in Déols, but who were not present at the time of the miracle, took particular interest in the report since one of their own had instigated the phenomenon and died as a result. To satisfy their curiosity that the event had taken place as reported, a company of soldiers went to the spot the next day. Among them was the brother of the English king, who recovered the hand of the Infant Jesus. After picking it up, he wrapped it in his cloak, when suddenly bright red blood began to flow from the stone hand—to the terror of all the spectators. In addition to these two blood sheddings, other prodigies are said to have taken place. These were so spectacular that they caused Philippi Auguste, King of France, and Richard the Lion Hearted, King of England, to become reconciled for a time.

After the miracle, the statue was removed to a chapel in the abbey church. Dedicated to Our Lady of Miracles, the chapel became the site of numerous pilgrimages in which, through the years, several popes, a number of future Saints and many noblemen took part. During the French Revolution, the abbey was pillaged and plundered. The statue of Our Lady and the Child Jesus was viciously broken and seriously damaged. The disfigured statue was providentially retrieved by an elderly woman, who secretly kept it until peace was restored. After the miraculous statue was returned to the possession of the Church, it was repaired and clothed in elegant garments.

A confraternity that was established in 1187 in memory of the blood shedding flourished until the Revolution but was reorganized in 1830. Members of this confraternity, in addition to many pilgrims, commemorate the miracle of Notre-Dame de Déols every year on May 31, the anniversary of the miracle. During an elaborate ceremony in the year 1899, the archbishop of Bourges demonstrated the Church’s affection for the statue by bestowing precious crowns on the heads of both Mother and Child. The abbey that figured in the miracle is still in ruins. The statue of Mother and Child is now found in one of the chapels of St. Etienne’s Church, where the Child Jesus remains without His hand in sad remembrance of the disrespectful action that took place over 800 years ago.

~Source:”Miraculous Images of Our Lord”

Eucharistic Miracles

Eucharistic Miracle of Tumaco

On January 31, 1906, an earthquake having a magnitude of 8.8 on the Richter scale, occurred off the coast of Columbia. Ranking as one of the ten worst on record, it caused a tsunami that was felt as far north as San Francisco and as far west as Japan.

In Panama City, it picked up boats and hurled them long distances, crashed into the market area and wreaked tremendous damage. The worst effects of the tsunami were concentrated along the northern parts of Ecuador and southern parts of Columbia. In the middle of this area, at the outer edge of a bay, lay the small island of Tumaco.

About 10:00 in the morning, the earth shook violently for ten minutes. The inhabitants begged the local pastor, Fr. Gerardo Larrondo, to lead a procession with the Blessed Sacrament. The sea had already penetrated a kilometer and a half inland. A wall of water was building up that threatened to swallow the entire island, which was only about 3 kilometers in length.

Fr. Larrondo consumed the small Hosts in the ciborium and set the large Host aside. He called out to his people: “Let us go, my people. Let us go toward the beach, and may God have pity on us.” Led by Fr. Larrondo and the Eucharist, they began to march. Fr. Larrondo advanced courageously to the water’s edge and as the wave came rushing in he calmly raised the Sacred Host and traced the sign of the Cross.

The wave halted and then receded. Fr. Larrondo and Fr. Julian alongside him saw what was transpiring . The people, overjoyed, cried out “Miracle, miracle!”

The miracle of Tumaco became known across the world, and Fr. Larrondo received letters from people all over Europe asking for his prayers.